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A-painting-of-a-Spanish-man-and-a-Peruvian-indigenous-woman-with-Mestizo-child-1770
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annatto cauliflower
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papaya habenaro sorbet copy
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sf31b2lq

MASA

GUACWARD MOMENTS

AVOCADOISM AND THE 70‘S

When Green Appliances Ruled TV

 

     I have noticed that the love and hate of avocado appliances depends on one’s age. If you are over 50, you experienced the greenish hue as new and innovative. Under 50, you remember the color as secondhand. Under 30, it is retro cool.

     For me, avocados—both as a food and as a kitchen color—conjure up memories of my 1970’s childhood in Southern California. As my Mexican parents watched TV with their American-born children, we were given sneak peaks into TV Land’s Anglo homes. We noticed that The Brady Bunch, Bewitched and That Girl all had avocado green appliances in their spotless and disconcertingly clutter-free kitchens.

     When my father watched TV with us he would always point them out with pride. “You see that? That’s avocado green.” Only he would say it in Spanish.

A “Rear Window” view of the Stevens’ in their kitchen.

See Darren run by the avocado washer and dryer. Run, Darwood, run!

 

That Girl went as far as to match her outfit with her appliances.

 

 

The Brady Bunch kitchen was accented with poppy orange.

Not the ubiquitous harvest gold of the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeannie didn’t cook. She was the internet.

 

Mary Richard’s kitchen appliances remain a mystery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But Mary Tyler Moore pimped white appliances on her spare time.

 

Florida Evans was poor. Ergo, no avocado appliances.

 

     My parents happily took note as the color caught on in middle-class homes. But the trend turned into an eerie Stephen King novella. The murky “meteor juice” spread through kitchens, absorbing everything in its path including walls and shag carpets. By the mid-70’s, entire bathrooms were covered in a putrid green no longer reminiscent of the ripe fruit.

     During this era of counter-culture (following the recent counter-culture of the 60’s), Mexican cuisine was losing its identity. Mexican mothers, who always felt out of step in their new country, were convinced that their traditional dishes were not good enough to “reach the big table.”  Some women eagerly started incorporating American ingredients, like processed flour and cheddar cheese, into their embarrassingly outdated dishes. Ironically, the goal was to create the standard Mexican food being served at American restaurants. As a result, many traditional ingredients of the pre-Hispanic days began to disappear.

     How many times did I hear one of my siblings whine, “I’m sick of Mexican food. Let’s go to Taco Bell!”

     Which brings me back to the appliances of my youth. With the recognition of an indigenous fruit from Mexico in America’s most beloved television kitchens, we viewed the avocado color as a symbol of pride. Shortly after the TV shows’ cancellations—followed by their successful syndications—Mexican cuisine also experienced a renaissance. In the early 1980’s, Mexican chefs created the “nueva cocina Mexicana,” a transitional movement to restore pre-Hispanic cuisine with New World ingredients. Coincidence? Maybe, or maybe the great chefs of Norte America tuned into the same shows and experienced a growing solidarity through syndication.

     In retrospect, the mass market design of dark paneled walls and murky colors may have been the mainstream’s attempt to spread conformity as a trend. For my family, who aspired to be middle class, purchasing the appliances declared that we had made it. Oh, how I loved our avocado green refrigerator and how the edges were a slightly darker shade. It took my 10-year-old breath away.

IF YOUR APLLIANCE  are green they are not actually green. On an environmental note, if you still have an original avocado appliance chugging away in your home, consider retirement. The old refrigerators, for example, use three to four times the power of today’s models.

RECIPES

Before Avocado Toast...

 

 

AVOCADO MARGARITA

 

Alas,  I have no tequila in my home. If anyone reading this has all of the ingredients… ¡Salud!

Ingredients

  • 1/2 avocado, peeled and pitted

  • 2/3 cup sweet and sour margarita mix

  • 1/2 cup tequila

  • 1/2 cup  Triple Sec

  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice

  • 2 tablespoons cilantro

  • 3 cups ice

  • A pinch of margarita salt

  • A pinch of chili powder

Method

Place avocado, margarita mix, tequila, liqueur, lime juice and cilantro in a blender. Cover and blend until smooth. Pour into glasses filled with ice and rimmed with chili-lime salt. Garnish with lime and slice of avocado.

DEVILISH EGGS

 

     Planning on making deviled eggs? Put the mayo back in the fridge and reach for an avocado. Loaded with folate, potassium, vitamin C and vitamin B6, avocados are a delicious way to get the most beneficial nutrients (and flavor) from these little devils,.

And eggs? Well are have high-quality proteins, vitamins, minerals, good fats and various trace nutrients

 

Ingredients

  • 6 hard boiled eggs

  • 1 small avocado

  • 2 tsp fresh lime juice

  • 1 tbsp minced red onion

  • 1 tbsp minced jalapeno (add seeds for heat)

  • 1 tbsp chopped cilantro

  • Pinch of salt and pepper

  • Lime zest

Method

Cover eggs with cold water by 1 1/2 inches in a 3-quart heavy saucepan. Bring water to boil for six minutes, and then turn off burner and cover. After 15 minutes, run eggs under cold water.

Peel and slice each egg in half. Scoop out the egg yolks. In a bowl, mash yolks, avocado and remaining ingredients together. Add the mixture to the egg halves. Garnish with lime zest.

Makes 12

 

 

TOMATILLO AVOCADO SALSA

The bright acidity of the tomatillos is balanced by the creamy avocado in this raw salsa. A rich source of vitamins C, B, and E as well as fiber, this salsa can be enjoyed on tacos, crudités, tortilla chips, or whatever your heart desires.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cilantro (leaves and tender stems are fine)

  • 1½ cups tomatillos, roughly chopped (about 3-4 medium)

  • ½ cup yellow onion, roughly chopped

  • 1 clove garlic

  • 1 avocado

  • 2 tablespoons lime juice

  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Method

Layer ingredients in a blender, adding the cilantro first to ease processing. Blend all ingredients until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to enjoy.

Makes 2 cups

 

 

BAKED AVOCADO WITH EGGS

 

A stuffed avocado is perfect for breakfast and only takes minutes to make. If you are in a real hurry use your microwave. Serve with salsa and toast.

Ingredients

  • 1 avocado

  • Olive oil

  • 2 whole eggs

  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Halve an avocado and remove the pit. Place one half in a ring of aluminum foil so it stays upright. Brush with olive oil. Crack an egg into the hollow of the avocado. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Repeat with remaining half. Broil for 5 minutes. Serve with toasted bread.

Makes 2

 

 

BAKED AVOCADO FRIES

 

 

 

The most common way to eat avocados may be in salads but there are more decadent ways to enjoy this fruit. Like crispy baked avocado fries. Keep in mind that this is the basic recipe. Feel free to add your favorite ingredients, such as garlic, grated cheese, and paprika. Serve with jalapeño or chipotle dip.

Ingredients 

  • 2 ripe and firm avocados

  • 1 large egg, beaten

  • 1 cup flour or cornmeal

  • 1 tbsp. melted butter or olive oil

  • Pinch salt and pepper

Method

     Preheat oven to 400°. Peel the avocado and cut vertically into eight slices. Dip avocado slices in beaten egg and then roll in the cornmeal, melted butter, salt, pepper mixture. Place rolled slices on the parchment and bake for 20 minutes. Serve with jalapeno sauce.

Makes enough to fill you up without feeling too guilty.

 

 

SPICED AVOCADO CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

 

This rich and spicy chocolate mousse is both decadent and good for you! The cacao tree originated in Mesoamerica, and it was in Mexico that the pleasures of consuming chocolate were first discovered. Native peoples not only ingested cacao, but the beans served as religious offerings, and currency. Today, while chocolate is generally favored as a sweet treat, or gifted as a romantic gesture, we know that chocolate contains potent antioxidant compounds called flavonols. Found also in tea, red wine, and cranberries, flavonols support healthy blood pressure, blood flow, and heart health. The avocado in this recipe is a source of heart-healthy fat, and the cinnamon and cayenne pepper are warming spices that also support heart health and circulation.

Ingredients

  • 2 large, ripe avocados

  • ½ cup good quality chopped dark chocolate (preferably 70%)

  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

  • 1/3 cup coconut milk

  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

  • 2 teaspoons coconut palm sugar

  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon

  • Pinch cayenne pepper

  • Pinch of sea salt

Method

Bring an inch of water to a simmer in a saucepan. Place chocolate in a heatproof bowl that fits in the mouth of the pot, and make sure water doesn’t touch the bottom of the bowl. Stir chocolate as it melts, and when just a few small solid chunks remain, remove bowl from heat, and stir until smooth. Set aside to cool while you prepare remaining ingredients.

Halve avocados, remove pits, and scoop flesh into a food processor or blender. Add cocoa powder, coconut milk, vanilla, coconut palm sugar, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and salt. Blend until smooth, then stream in melted chocolate, stopping to scrape down bowl or blender as needed. Pour mixture into four ramekins or small glasses, and refrigerate until well chilled, a minimum of two hours. Enjoy as is, or top with fruit, or whipped cream.

 

POETS CORNER

 What peaches and what penumbras!  Whole families shopping at night!  Aisles full of husbands!  Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes!—and you, García Lorca, what were you doing down by the watermelons? Allen Ginsberg

AVOCADOS

GUACWARD MOMENTS

AVOCADOISM AND THE 70‘S

When Green Appliances Ruled TV

 

     I have noticed that the love and hate of avocado appliances depends on one’s age. If you are over 50, you experienced the greenish hue as new and innovative. Under 50, you remember the color as secondhand. Under 30, it is retro cool.

     For me, avocados—both as a food and as a kitchen color—conjure up memories of my 1970’s childhood in Southern California. As my Mexican parents watched TV with their American-born children, we were given sneak peaks into TV Land’s Anglo homes. We noticed that The Brady Bunch, Bewitched and That Girl all had avocado green appliances in their spotless and disconcertingly clutter-free kitchens.

     When my father watched TV with us he would always point them out with pride. “You see that? That’s avocado green.” Only he would say it in Spanish.

A “Rear Window” view of the Stevens’ in their kitchen.

See Darren run by the avocado washer and dryer. Run, Darwood, run!

 

That Girl went as far as to match her outfit with her appliances.

 

 

The Brady Bunch kitchen was accented with poppy orange.

Not the ubiquitous harvest gold of the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeannie didn’t cook. She was the internet.

 

Mary Richard’s kitchen appliances remain a mystery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But Mary Tyler Moore pimped white appliances on her spare time.

 

Florida Evans was poor. Ergo, no avocado appliances.

 

     My parents happily took note as the color caught on in middle-class homes. But the trend turned into an eerie Stephen King novella. The murky “meteor juice” spread through kitchens, absorbing everything in its path including walls and shag carpets. By the mid-70’s, entire bathrooms were covered in a putrid green no longer reminiscent of the ripe fruit.

     During this era of counter-culture (following the recent counter-culture of the 60’s), Mexican cuisine was losing its identity. Mexican mothers, who always felt out of step in their new country, were convinced that their traditional dishes were not good enough to “reach the big table.”  Some women eagerly started incorporating American ingredients, like processed flour and cheddar cheese, into their embarrassingly outdated dishes. Ironically, the goal was to create the standard Mexican food being served at American restaurants. As a result, many traditional ingredients of the pre-Hispanic days began to disappear.

     How many times did I hear one of my siblings whine, “I’m sick of Mexican food. Let’s go to Taco Bell!”

     Which brings me back to the appliances of my youth. With the recognition of an indigenous fruit from Mexico in America’s most beloved television kitchens, we viewed the avocado color as a symbol of pride. Shortly after the TV shows’ cancellations—followed by their successful syndications—Mexican cuisine also experienced a renaissance. In the early 1980’s, Mexican chefs created the “nueva cocina Mexicana,” a transitional movement to restore pre-Hispanic cuisine with New World ingredients. Coincidence? Maybe, or maybe the great chefs of Norte America tuned into the same shows and experienced a growing solidarity through syndication.

     In retrospect, the mass market design of dark paneled walls and murky colors may have been the mainstream’s attempt to spread conformity as a trend. For my family, who aspired to be middle class, purchasing the appliances declared that we had made it. Oh, how I loved our avocado green refrigerator and how the edges were a slightly darker shade. It took my 10-year-old breath away.

IF YOUR APLLIANCE  are green they are not actually green. On an environmental note, if you still have an original avocado appliance chugging away in your home, consider retirement. The old refrigerators, for example, use three to four times the power of today’s models.

RECIPES

Before Avocado Toast...

 

 

AVOCADO MARGARITA

 

Alas,  I have no tequila in my home. If anyone reading this has all of the ingredients… ¡Salud!

Ingredients

  • 1/2 avocado, peeled and pitted

  • 2/3 cup sweet and sour margarita mix

  • 1/2 cup tequila

  • 1/2 cup  Triple Sec

  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice

  • 2 tablespoons cilantro

  • 3 cups ice

  • A pinch of margarita salt

  • A pinch of chili powder

Method

Place avocado, margarita mix, tequila, liqueur, lime juice and cilantro in a blender. Cover and blend until smooth. Pour into glasses filled with ice and rimmed with chili-lime salt. Garnish with lime and slice of avocado.

DEVILISH EGGS

 

     Planning on making deviled eggs? Put the mayo back in the fridge and reach for an avocado. Loaded with folate, potassium, vitamin C and vitamin B6, avocados are a delicious way to get the most beneficial nutrients (and flavor) from these little devils,.

And eggs? Well are have high-quality proteins, vitamins, minerals, good fats and various trace nutrients

 

Ingredients

  • 6 hard boiled eggs

  • 1 small avocado

  • 2 tsp fresh lime juice

  • 1 tbsp minced red onion

  • 1 tbsp minced jalapeno (add seeds for heat)

  • 1 tbsp chopped cilantro

  • Pinch of salt and pepper

  • Lime zest

Method

Cover eggs with cold water by 1 1/2 inches in a 3-quart heavy saucepan. Bring water to boil for six minutes, and then turn off burner and cover. After 15 minutes, run eggs under cold water.

Peel and slice each egg in half. Scoop out the egg yolks. In a bowl, mash yolks, avocado and remaining ingredients together. Add the mixture to the egg halves. Garnish with lime zest.

Makes 12

 

 

TOMATILLO AVOCADO SALSA

The bright acidity of the tomatillos is balanced by the creamy avocado in this raw salsa. A rich source of vitamins C, B, and E as well as fiber, this salsa can be enjoyed on tacos, crudités, tortilla chips, or whatever your heart desires.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cilantro (leaves and tender stems are fine)

  • 1½ cups tomatillos, roughly chopped (about 3-4 medium)

  • ½ cup yellow onion, roughly chopped

  • 1 clove garlic

  • 1 avocado

  • 2 tablespoons lime juice

  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Method

Layer ingredients in a blender, adding the cilantro first to ease processing. Blend all ingredients until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to enjoy.

Makes 2 cups

 

 

BAKED AVOCADO WITH EGGS

 

A stuffed avocado is perfect for breakfast and only takes minutes to make. If you are in a real hurry use your microwave. Serve with salsa and toast.

Ingredients

  • 1 avocado

  • Olive oil

  • 2 whole eggs

  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Halve an avocado and remove the pit. Place one half in a ring of aluminum foil so it stays upright. Brush with olive oil. Crack an egg into the hollow of the avocado. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Repeat with remaining half. Broil for 5 minutes. Serve with toasted bread.

Makes 2

 

 

BAKED AVOCADO FRIES

 

 

 

The most common way to eat avocados may be in salads but there are more decadent ways to enjoy this fruit. Like crispy baked avocado fries. Keep in mind that this is the basic recipe. Feel free to add your favorite ingredients, such as garlic, grated cheese, and paprika. Serve with jalapeño or chipotle dip.

Ingredients 

  • 2 ripe and firm avocados

  • 1 large egg, beaten

  • 1 cup flour or cornmeal

  • 1 tbsp. melted butter or olive oil

  • Pinch salt and pepper

Method

     Preheat oven to 400°. Peel the avocado and cut vertically into eight slices. Dip avocado slices in beaten egg and then roll in the cornmeal, melted butter, salt, pepper mixture. Place rolled slices on the parchment and bake for 20 minutes. Serve with jalapeno sauce.

Makes enough to fill you up without feeling too guilty.

 

 

SPICED AVOCADO CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

 

This rich and spicy chocolate mousse is both decadent and good for you! The cacao tree originated in Mesoamerica, and it was in Mexico that the pleasures of consuming chocolate were first discovered. Native peoples not only ingested cacao, but the beans served as religious offerings, and currency. Today, while chocolate is generally favored as a sweet treat, or gifted as a romantic gesture, we know that chocolate contains potent antioxidant compounds called flavonols. Found also in tea, red wine, and cranberries, flavonols support healthy blood pressure, blood flow, and heart health. The avocado in this recipe is a source of heart-healthy fat, and the cinnamon and cayenne pepper are warming spices that also support heart health and circulation.

Ingredients

  • 2 large, ripe avocados

  • ½ cup good quality chopped dark chocolate (preferably 70%)

  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

  • 1/3 cup coconut milk

  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

  • 2 teaspoons coconut palm sugar

  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon

  • Pinch cayenne pepper

  • Pinch of sea salt

Method

Bring an inch of water to a simmer in a saucepan. Place chocolate in a heatproof bowl that fits in the mouth of the pot, and make sure water doesn’t touch the bottom of the bowl. Stir chocolate as it melts, and when just a few small solid chunks remain, remove bowl from heat, and stir until smooth. Set aside to cool while you prepare remaining ingredients.

Halve avocados, remove pits, and scoop flesh into a food processor or blender. Add cocoa powder, coconut milk, vanilla, coconut palm sugar, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and salt. Blend until smooth, then stream in melted chocolate, stopping to scrape down bowl or blender as needed. Pour mixture into four ramekins or small glasses, and refrigerate until well chilled, a minimum of two hours. Enjoy as is, or top with fruit, or whipped cream.

 

POETS CORNER

 What peaches and what penumbras!  Whole families shopping at night!  Aisles full of husbands!  Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes!—and you, García Lorca, what were you doing down by the watermelons? Allen Ginsberg

IMG_1132
A-painting-of-a-Spanish-man-and-a-Peruvian-indigenous-woman-with-Mestizo-child-1770
Unknown-8
images-15_edited
images-1_edited_edited
images-9_edited
images-1_edited
annatto cauliflower
118548_MXM_K580420S_OR1_CR_640x428_edited
1291731f7cc08ebabbd9cd9c3c17815d_edited_edited
images-9_edited
images-10
escabeche
images-6
images-15
IMG_0275
IMG_0305
straw_edited
images-16_edited
images-17_edited
images-1
IMG_0117_edited_edited
images-1_edited_edited
images-14_edited
images-5_edited
Unknown-3_edited
images-30
IMG_0235
IMG_0028
37673-4-sopa-de-tortilla-mexicana-recetas-para-ninos_edited
images-3_edited_edited
images-2
images-7_edited
tomatillo-1
HIS_edited
IMG_0301
IMG_3657_edited
images-10_edited
29612b_e0da89c04a554cf990801997abf3e40d-mv2_d_2904_2640_s_4_2
papaya habenaro sorbet copy
images
sf31b2lq